Dragonfly Environmental


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Tracking a feral animal? Here’s how to get it right!

Properly identifying and tracking an animal is an essential skill for any practising ecologist. The following is a series of techniques that will allow for efficient and accurate tracking using the tracks of an animal.

Many animals classified as feral (such as cats, dogs and foxes) have four padded feet that make complete contact with the ground. This feature is fantastic for differentiating feral animals from five-padded native animals such as possums, quolls and wallabies.

Other track identifying characteristics include the shape, size and foot placement of the animal when they walk. Usually dog prints are larger than a foxes which are then followed by a cats print (Illustrated in the figure below).

Fox and dog prints can be differentiated by the size and shape of the print. A fox print is usually more oval in shape than that of a dogs print and the prints should be fairly close to one another. Cat toes are more compressed and arranged in a semi-circular form around a central pad. This results in a more circular print which is smaller in size. As cats have retractable claws, there is usually no sign of claws in the print.

Despite having this knowledge, it can still be difficult to identify some of the most common feral animals especially when you consider the large size variation in domestic dog breeds.

Dragonfly Environmental are continuing to maintain the saltmarsh and estuary rehabilitation works in Penrhyn – a site which has had continuous fox presence. These foxes impact not only the migratory birds but also the oyster catchers and nested terns that reside there. More information on this project is provided on our website: http://www.dfe.net.au/projects/ecological-restoration/

Special acknowledgment to Andrew Hide and Scott Thompson for this information: http://www.terrestrialecosystems.com/tracking-a-feral-would-you-get-it-right/

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Green Velvet

http://eastsidefm.org/specialist/green-velvet/

East side FM for any of you in Sydney Eastern Suburbs area – Bondi and Beyond!  This interview with ECA Director Mia Dalby-Ball is about bringing in areas of ecology into urban areas – starts after 11.40 can easily click to that.

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Ecology Tree Assessments Dragonfly Environmental

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Dragonfly Environmental - Wildlife Tree Assessments

Dragonfly Environmental – Wildlife Tree Assessments

 

Dragonfly Environmental Images Umina

NRMA Umina Beach Resort. Fauna Survey by Dragonfly Environmental   Possum created high-rise in Hollow

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Egg and Possum Skull found in Tree Hollow – Owl expected.

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Owl Log ???????????????????????????????

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Noisy Minors – prolific

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Hollows in trees – great habitat

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Brush tail Possum in tree hollow

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Habitat for many animals including Micro-bats – under the flaking wood.

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Male Water Dragon – just outside the resort

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Bushfire Sunset ???????????????????????????????

Scaly Breasted Lorikeet

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Entrance to the Ocean – Umina Beach

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White’s Skink in a tree hollow,  Photo Cameron Radford

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Brush-tail Possums common and abundant – seen here with red filter over the spotlight – the red reduces the brightness of the light and is less disturbing to wildlife.

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Bushland adjoining the resort – termite nest with Kookaburra nest (above)   Kookaburra leaving nest (below)

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Bushland adjoining the resort – Satin Bower Bird display area – Wonderful!

Ecology Tree Assessments

Cameron inspecting the tree hollow and signs of wild-life.

Tree inspection for wildlife by Dragonfly Environmental

This gallery contains 20 photos


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Join us for a free Guided Walk and Talk in Bidjigal Reserve

Join us for a free Guided Walk and Talk

in Bidjigal Reserve

Saturday June 1st

1.30pm – 3pm

With Traditional Knowledge Holder

Tony Williams

Along with Ecologist Mia Dalby-Ball and Paul Harvey on the Waterways

Bidjigal Reserve – in the centre of the Hills

Enquiries call Dragonfly Environmental 9918 4486 or email mia@dfe.net.au

Saturday June 1st

1.30pm – 3pm

 

Meeting Place

Playground at the end of Grangewood Pl.

West Pennant Hills

 

Afternoon Tea, Free Native Plant Giveaway.

All WELCOME

 

Powerful Owl Walk 3.30 to 4.30

Enquiries call Dragonfly Environmental 9918 4486 or email mia@dfe.net.au