Dragonfly Environmental


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Avalon Headland Caring for Bush

Avalon Headland is in Sydney NSW. A Coastal place with wonderful sea-cliffs and heath land vegetation.  Here are some of the flowers out in late August. Photos by Deborah Richardson of Dragonfly Environmental.

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It is Orchid Time

image001Many species of orchids can still be found in bushland reserves in rainforest, heathland, open forest, grassland, swamps, by the sea or inland, and in either moist or dry conditions.

Orchids not always visible as they have part or all of their leaves underground. and it The ubderground tubers (tuberoids) are usually small and white. OS if your digging and you find them – put them back J with care.

Most ground orchids have a dormant period when they remain underground (mostly during the summer months).  Others such as Cryptostylis species (green hoods) are evergreen. They are also all Wasp Pollinated. ,

The leaves and flowering stem start to fade soon after flowering finishes and they live off nutrients stored in their underground tuberoids during their dormant period. After good autumn rains, the plants sprout, the leaves and flowering stem grow and the cycle begins again. The flowering period is relatively short, ranging from a few days in some cases to several weeks for others. It often depends on how soon an insect pollinates the flowers as to how long they remain in flower.

As a result of all this and because orchids are probably only really noticed when they are in flower, I think it is a good idea for bush regenerators to be able to recognize the leaves of orchids.

In Lilli Pilli Reserve (in Sutherland Shire in the south of Sydney) we have often cleared rock outcrops completely when they have been covered in dense mats of asparagus, thinking that it is easier in the long run for bush regenerators to have cleared rock surfaces. However, it has been noticed that when the asparagus root system has been left on the rock (after being killed), that there are now terrestrial orchids and other seedlings regenerating naturally.

Either there has been a seed bank there, or the root system has provided a suitable bed for seeds to develop. Obviously this would not be a consideration in all situations, but is worth thinking out.

Avoid having people or sprayers in areas where orchids grow!


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Why We love What We Do!

Valuable Final Product

Jocelyne showing us that she is going above and beyond achieving our Valuable Final Product VFP:

“Cared For and Restored Natural Areas Resulting In Improved Environments for Now and the Future!”

And look what is above her in the tree! 🙂

Dragonfly Environmental is Caring fot these Reserves on Scotland Island in Pittwater.  Access is by boat only and the big Spotted Gum trees, Eucalyptus maculata, are old enough to have significant hollows which are used by birds such as these Cockatoos and mammals such as Brush-tail Possums.  Rare microbats also roost in some of the tree hollows.

Dragonfly Environmental is managing weeds in these reserves to keep the natural areas growing.  The areas are listed as Spotted Gum Endangered Ecological Communities because without Care they will decline in health, habitat value and diversity.

Dragonfly Environmental is also managing bushfire hazards in an environmentally appropriate way.  Dragonfly Environmentalare well expereinced in Fire Hazard Asset Protection.


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Mass Contract Planting

Mass Contract Planting

Mass Contract Planting

Big Appreciation!

Great Appreciation to all in the Dragonfly team you worked consistently and fast with high care and quality on the recent planting jobs at Blacktown and Beaumont Hills. It was a huge effort with over 38,000 new native plants in the ground. Well done team!

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Native Plant of the Week

Native Plant

Native Plant

Native of the Week: Eupomatia laurina Bolwarra

This beautiful plant is an Australian Native! Eupomatia laurina, known as Bolwarra or sometimes Native Guava or Copper Laurel. It is a shrub to small tree, often seen between 3 and 5 metres tall. Larger specimens attain a height of 15 metres and a trunk diameter of 30 cm.

Native to eastern Australia, from as far south as Nowa Nowa in the state of Victoria and as far as north as Cooktown in tropical Queensland and also New Guinea. It is a primitive flowering plant, usually growing as an understorey in rainforest or wet sclerophyll forest.

This one is growing in Cabbage Tree Palm Forest at RSL War Vet’s village at Narabeen Lagoon.  Dragonfly Environmental is supervising the bush regeneration of this important vegetation.

 

Dragonfly Environmental